Homebrew Chocolate-Chili Stout

The “Beaver Avenue Brewer’s Guild” (BABG) brewed this beer on January 10. I did some work on v1.0 of the recipe, I attached the recipe below.

I’m affectionately calling it Poseidon’s Wrath, a name first suggested as a taunt related to the snow this morning by Nikki.

Anyway, the beer went great. I believe made some adjustments based on using baker’s chocolate (decrease the hops because this adds bitterness), switched to a tsp. of cayenne pepper instead of Ancho and Serrano, and he planning on extracting vanilla beans, cocoa nibs, and cinnamon sticks for the secondary. All said, the brewday went extremely well and I think this recipe is going to work out great.

Poseidon’s Wrath Imperial Stout

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
5 gal 90 min 47.6 IBUs 38.1 SRM 1.085 1.017 9.0 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pale Malt (2 Row) US 11.906 lbs 69.06
Munich Malt - 20L 1.706 lbs 9.89
Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L 1.19 lbs 6.9
Caramel/Crystal Malt - 80L 1.19 lbs 6.9
Chocolate Malt 1 lbs 5.8
Black (Patent) Malt 4 oz 1.45

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Goldings, East Kent 1.81 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 5
Willamette 1.16 oz 30 min Boil Pellet 5.5
Willamette 1.16 oz 15 min Boil Pellet 5.5
Goldings, East Kent 0.4 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 5
Willamette 0.4 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 5.5

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Irish Moss 0.50 tsp 10 min Boil Fining

Notes

Add .5 lb cocoa nibs

Add 1 ounce of Ancho Chile at 0 min

Add 1 ounce of Serrano Chile at 0 min

Brewing the 15-minute IPA

With a boil time of 15 minutes, you’re getting a lot done. This recipe is designed mostly to test varieties of hops in a somewhat controlled environment. I add a small bag of specialty grains, in my version, to add just a hint of malt flavor behind the hops–I think it provides a better backboard for tasting the hops.

First, the recipe for a 1 gallon batch and then the process:

15 Minutes IPA

Grains, Yeast and Hops:

  • 1 oz hops, your choice. (I’ve used Citra, Mosaic and Chinook)
  • 1.5 lbs Light Dry Malt Extract [DME] (keeping it simple)
  • 4.8 oz Caramel/Crystal Malt 60L
  • SafAle English Ale #S-04 (1/2 packet)

Continue reading “Brewing the 15-minute IPA”

Sour Dough Spent Grain Bread

I would apologize that I haven’t updated the blog in a few weeks, but to be honest nothing interesting was happening during (hopefully) the last big chill of the season.

I’ve talked about spent grain bread before, now I can update with a new twist on that recipe. This week Rebecca and I were able to make spent grain sour dough bread using some yeast I caught here in Cincinnati. It ended up with a great yogurty sourness that went well with honey.

I caught the yeast by throwing some rye flour and water into a bowl with a towel covering it and letting the bowl sit out in our house for 48 hours. It took longer to see bubbles than others had advised me due to the lower temperature of the house.

I took about 1/4 of the slurry and mixed it with more flour and water every 24 hours for a week or so (sometimes going as long as 3 days). By day 7 it had a really sour smell and was very acidic. Rebecca took about 1/4 of the culture and threw it in some water with more flour near our pre-heating stove. The yeast took off and eventually she began following the spent grain recipe with this yeast instead of the dry active yeast prescribed by the recipe.

It took about 24 hours for rising to fully occur. She punched it down about halfway through and let it rise again. The rise wasn’t huge like a regular yeast, but it was enough to warrant attempting to bake the dough.

What came out was what is pictured above. A really nice dense but moist bread with a really complex sour flavor reminiscent of plain Greek yogurt.

Since she baked the bread I’ve started feeding and diluting the yeast more, I think it was less vigorous due to acidification and am hoping that this will correct that problem. Once the yeast became more active (eating everything in under 12 hours) I threw the whole thing in the fridge for storage until we want to make bread again.

Unfortunately I don’t have more concrete numbers or measurements for this post. Yeast culturing turned out to be much more of an art due to my haphazzard method.

Modernist Cuisine Beer Cheese Mac + Cheese

I love to tell people about sodium citrate, a chemical that is similar to what the inventors of Velveeta used to keep their cheese from separating into fats and proteins. It works great for creating nacho cheese and cheese sauce at home using a few ounces of cheese, a bit of water, and some sodium citrate.

You can easily find the recipe on the Modernist Cuisine Website. I cobbled together the advice of a few different recipes to create what, effectively, tasted like beer cheese. If you want to recreate out creation follow the recipe below:

Modernist Beer Cheese:

Ingredients

 

  • 265 g Dunkelweiss beer
  • 11 g Sodium Citrate
  • 285g (10 oz)  of Vermont Sharp Cheddar (I ended up using 11.5 oz)
  • 2 cups cooked macaroni (or whatever pasta you prefer)

 

Directions

  1. Combine sodium citrate and beer into a pot, whisking to dissolve, and bring to a simmer over medium heat.
  2. Add cheese slowly to simmering liquid, blending with an immersion blender (or just whisk really hard, like I did)
  3. Mix cheese sauce with macaroni/pasta

The beer is really the key difference here, the added flavor contributed by the dunkelweiss gives a distinct beer-cheese flavor that adds to the sharp cheddar flavor of undiluted cheddar cheese (we may try adding some mozzarella next time to thing the flavor a bit, it got intense). We also discussed adding garlic and roasted onions and peppers. In addition, Rebecca has promised to make some spent grain bread to go along with it (so we can mop up the extra).

If you have problems with the emulsion refer to the original recipe (linked above) and look at the tips section.