Last update, Sept. 19th? Yikes!

Since the 19th I attended the Kentucky APA conference down in Louisville and the Awesome Collective’s mini-conference in Covington, Ky.

The government also shut down and the ACA’s health care exchanges went live. Its been a busy few weeks.

Kentucky APA

The Kentucky APA conference was held on Friday, September 27th, and it was my first state APA conferenc. The buffet lunch was hearty and almost broke my calories budget for the day! Luckily I came in 100 calories below my goal thanks to a long evening walk.

We ended up arriving late and missed the Ethics session but arrived right on time for the Law session. The presenter was interesting and the topics covered all centered around how to stay out of court and whether you could be charged with practicing law without a license.

The session over lunch discussed the successes of various groups and their urban redevelopment projects in and around Louisville. I found the delicious lunch a little more than distracting.

The afternoon started with a round table on rural development. Everyone had something to say about “poo” (waster water treatment). However, the session was marked by a lack of depth as each presenter shotgunned through data, maps, and discussion point.

Finally, the conference ended with a presentation from the NKAPC (and friends) to discuss the Crittenden-Piner Tornado, which I’ve heard about in other venues. The breakout success of the presentation was Andy Hatzos of the National Weather Service, whose sheer passion kept my interest throughout.

Be Awsome! A Mini-conference for Community Change-makers.

Held yesterday, October 3rd, the Awesomeness Mini-conference was held at various locations around Covington, Ky. Highlights from the parts I attended (there were breakout sessions at time) included Griffin Van Meter, whose epic beard nearly stole the show, Tarek Kamil, who inspired my to start tracking my own awesomeness index, and Seth Beattie and Brian Friedman from Collinwood in Cleveland, Ohio.

Seth and Brian’s presentation was near and dear to my heart as an ex-rust belt native. Their project and its success was worth hearing about. Redevelopment attuned to the creative class is working for them on both the engagement and revitalization levels.

Tarek Kamil had excellent presenting skills and had a topic that anyone could relate to. The major take away is, in a nut shell, track something (like happiness) because tracking something is better than knowing nothing. And when you track something you can change try to change something.

Griffin Van Meter was perhaps the most disorganized but also the most engaging. His oratory style is unique and his passion is contagious. His success with the NoLi CDC was interesting to hear about if only because I’m an Economic Developer/Urban Planner, and that type of work is our bread and butter.

Overall the conference was interesting, informative, and inspiring. Hopefully some community change does arise from the conference.

Government Shutdown

You never realize how much you need government websites until they’re gone. For work I find myself cruising Census.gov and other data sources at least weekly. Tuesday morning, a midst the growing pains of the ACA Exchange websites, I found myself stopped from completing a good chunk of work on my current projects.

Hopefully the whole shutdown is resolved sooner, rather than later, and without any major concessions on the Affordable Care Act. I’m not a hardcore liberal, but the stories I’ve heard on the ground here in Kentucky suggest that its as necessary and prescient as Gov. Beshear says it is.

Health Care Exchanges

I’ve managed to get quotes from both Kentucky and Ohio’s exchanges now, and in both states my healthcare costs would be less than a third of my employer’s current cost to provide health insurance with similar benefits, similar deductible, and the same provider if I lived in Kentucky (where I currently work).

Stories have been coming out all week about the demand placed on these exchange websites alongside success stories of people from all over the political spectrum. Though, the one that caught my eye was that of an Alabama man who voted for Ron Paul that is touting the insurance he gets through Alabama’s exchange a success. Take this with a grain of salt, though, it comes from ThinkProgress.

Reggae Run

This weekend I’ll be running my first official 5k race, which I’m calling the Hell Hill Run. The 3.1 mi course takes place mostly up hill and will likely be the death of me.

I’ll report back Monday with a completion time (supposing I survive).

That about covers the last two weeks, now its all smooth sailing to the weekend.


David Spatholt

I work for Hamilton County's Community Development Division as the Program Development Specialist. My blog (www.spatholt.com) is a site where I catalog my professional thoughts and personal hobbies. All of my opinions are my own and do not reflect those of my employer. I often blog about urban planning, politics, public administration, brewing beer, running and technology.

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